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June 28, 2018
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June 26, 2018


As anyone from this neck of the woods will tell you, just about the grandest thing about Greystones is the fact that we’re on the sea – and that gives us our groovy South Beach…

It’s the place pretty much everyone heads when they’re out for a walk in Greystones, that stretch over to Ballygannon being the perfect place to get away from it all.

Better still, heading north, you’re greeted by The Men’s, The Cove and then you keep walking, right on down to the harbour.

Where Joe is waiting patiently with his battered cod.

Yep, we’re blessed to have this great big chunk of seafront. Here’s hoping the sun loves it just as much as we do over the coming years…

South Beach Postcard 1950s #1

South Beach postcard 1955. Source: ebay

Anyone care to guess the year…?

South Beach Postcard Colourised. Lawrence Collection

South Beach 14AUG69 Pic Lindsay Bridge [flickr]

A Packed South Beach. Source Mapio

South Beach postcard. Source: Unknown

South Beach postcard. From ages ago.

South Beach Valentine’s Postcard

Bathing Beauties – Greystones Style. Source Derek Paine

South Beach 14JULY1904. Notice portable diving board.

Mrs Ferns, Mrs McFarland & friend. Source Derek Paine

If you remember the South Beach like this, you might just be dead…

South Beach Postcard 1911

Greystones South Beach. Or is this the North Beach…? Source: The Eason Collection

A busy South Beach 1931. A Milton postcard

Grand South Beach postcard. Source Patrick Neary

St Patrick’s Parade 2917

South Beach Goes Full Snow. Pic: Una Campbell

South Beach Goes Full Snow. Pic: Una Campbell 2

South Beach Goes Full Snow. Pic: Una Campbell 3

South Beach Goes Full Snow. Pic: Una Campbell 4

Snowy South Beach 2010 Pic Dave Daly

South Beach Goes Full Snow. Pic: Una Campbell 5

Greystones South Beach Robert French

Greystones South Beach Damaged Robert French

Greystones South Beach and Railway Robert French

South Beach babes. Srouce Derek Paine

South Beach McKenzie Postcard

View Of The Beach ca 1900-1939 Eason Photographic Collection

The Temple of Urine. Pic: Sebastian

Andrew Batty goes a little batty during CSSM Source Jason Michael

J. Dunlop leads CSSM, Aug 1933, South Beach. Source Derek Paine

South Beach 1900 with stabilizers Pic Derek Paine

South Beach Postcard, with black flag

South Beach Water Harry Acheson

South Beach Steps Harry Acheson

South Beach Harry Acheson

Victorian Postcard. Source: Patrick Neary

1910 South Beach Postcard

South Beach last Tuesday. Around lunchtime.

Jane Evans & her South Beach Cafe. Source Derek Paine (800x499)

Jane Evans & her South Beach Cafe. Source Derek Paine

Evan’s Cafe, on the South Beach. Source Derek Paine

The South Beach. Pic: Luke McGuinness

Sunrise South Beach Rick Bentham

Moonrise South Beach Rick Bentham

Misty Morning South Beach Rick Bentham

South Beach Train. Pic: Luke McGuinness

South Beach Train departs. Pic: Luke McGuinness

South Beach Steam Train. Pic: Luke McGuinness

South Beach Steam Train #2. Pic: Luke McGuinness

South Beach 2007 by Paula McGuinness

South Beach (detail). Pic: Robert French

The Bathing Strand – aka The South Beach Source Derek Paine

South Beach 17july14 Pablo Photography

South Beach 17july14 Pablo Photography

Rainbow South Beach 18MAY17 Lisa Hempenstall

Rainbow On South Beach Sat 20MAY17 Brian Keeley

South Beach by Anna O’Rourke 2014

The Big Sky by John McKiernan FRI5JUNE20

Thank You & Goodnight by Shay Murphy

Morning Glory by Liz Cusack SAT9MAY20

Now, go jump in The Cove right here, The Men’s here, and de oul’ harbour here. Oh, and for incredible sexiness, check out the annual Christmas Day Swim right here.

1 Comment

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  1. David says:

    Great collection of photos, and nice to have all the South Beach ones together. I’ve always been a bit curious about the “Arches” – we say the 1st arch and the 2nd arch – but does anybody remember them as arches. I presume they were arched bridges (like the railway bridge near the harbour). Did flat style bridges even exist when the railway was built – around 1855. I’ve never seen a photo of them as arches though – and why were they “converted” to flat bridges anyhow? Also funny how two bridges were even built in the first place – at a time of relative hardship (1850s – just a decade after the famine…) seems a luxury to put two bridges so close together when one would have been enough? Perhaps the Burnaby Estate (then just land – the houses were built around 1900) insisted on them for access to the beach.
    Perhaps some railway/town/Burnaby/military (perhaps the army had a say – beach access being important for defense?) historians have some knowledge or there are similar situations on other coastal railways around the country?